University of Virginia
Morton is about to publish "Crania AEgyptiaca" and describes his great difficulty determining the ethnograpic character of Egyptians and Nubians. Notes descrepancies in travel narratives particulary in regard to the Barabra and Copts and asks if Prisse d'Avennes can provide information
American Philosophical Society
This collection of Morton letters forms part of a bound volume of incoming correspondence. It is a companion volume to the original letters in the Morton collection at the American Philosophical Society, which were also originally bound. Most of the subjects of the two collections overlap, but additional subjects in the microfilmed collection include American Indians, archaeology, Egyptology, and phrenology
American Philosophical Society
This collection includes correspondence, chiefly on scientific subjects, including education, medical practice, geology, mineralogy, craniology, paleontology, the Wilkes Exploring Expedition (also known as the United States Exploring Expedition 1838-1842), his publications ("Crania Americana" [1838] and "Crania Aegyptica"). In some of the letters, Morton writes as corresponding secretary of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia
Rosenbach Museum and Library
Morton corrects a typographical error in a paper which he published. Also corrects some errors in a list of mineral localities which he produced several years earlier
American Philosophical Society
This diary records a trip that Morton made to the West Indies. There are observations on many of the islands, such as those for Barbados, including comments on life, work, agriculture, slavery, and derogatory comments on the native inhabitants
Smithsonian Institution - Archives of American Art
Missouri Botanical Garden - Peter H. Raven Library
Incoming correspondence to George Engelmann from Samuel George Morton, for 1837-1847. The correspondence relates to the Academy of Natural Sciences; introduction to Engelmann of Gambel and Holmes
Library Company of Philadelphia
Mainly includes plates from two sources: an unidentified work by Jean- François Champollion and Charles Pickering's The races of man (1848), which is the ninth volume of Narrative of the United States exploring expedition ... under the command of Charles Wilkes. Also includes impressions from Egyptian tombs together with a letter from George Glidden as well as original artwork: pencil sketches depicting four Native Americans and portraits of Egyptians by Émile Prisse d'Avenne (two watercolor and one pencil). The inscriptions in the scrapbook are not in Morton's hand
American Philosophical Society
Through his craniometic studies of human races, the Philadelphia physician Samuel George Morton (1799-1851) exerted a profound influence on the development of physical anthropology in antebellum America, and made substantial contributions to mineralogy, paleontology, and natural history. Relating primarily to Morton's scientific interests, the Morton Papers include insights into Morton's perspectives on education, medical practice, geology and mineralogy, craniology, paleontology, the Wilkes Exploring Expedition (also known as the United States Exploring Expedition 1838-1842), and his two major monographs, the Crania Americana and Crania Aegyptiaca. Several of the letters were written by Morton in his capacity as corresponding secretary of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. Also included in this collection are Morton's "Some Remarks on the Infrequency of Mixed Offspring Between the European and Australian Races" (1850), Joseph Barclay Pentland's notes on the aborigines ... Read More
Yale University
Letter chiefly concerning a box of books sent by him to the recipient with the help of Karl Bodmer, as well as recent specimens collected, and requesting specimen of a mole

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