Iliff School of Theology - Ira J. Taylor Library‎
Scrapbook relates to the research and the 1938 publication of Merkel's book: History of Methodism in Utah. It includes: research notes, research correspondence, publishing correspondence, book orders, thank you notes and congratulations, and requests for assistance in Christian-Mormon relations
Iliff School of Theology - Ira J. Taylor Library‎
Clippings, photos, postcards, personal reminiscences, family genealogies, and histories collected by Mrs. Lottie H. Rogers. Deals with history of Freemont, Nebraska, as well as, details of Lottie H. Rogers family (the Rogers, the Heatons, and the Metcalfs). Mentions many people living in Freemont, Nebraska, including Rev. Jacob Adriance who pioneered Methodist churches in Colorado
Iliff School of Theology - Ira J. Taylor Library‎
Office papers highlighting the teaching, publishing, and research career of Hargrove. Includes numerous pieces of correspondence, publications, manuscripts, class notes and syllabi, administrative paper work, and sermons. Material detailing her work in church affairs and professional societies is more limited. Material from her involvement in the "New Religious Consciousness Project" is included. Hargrove's tenure at Iliff School of Theology, 1979-1988, is well documented. Less documentation is available for her teaching years at Hollins College, University of North Florida, and Yale Divinity School
Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library
The bulk of the items in the collection are receipted bills, mainly using printed billheads, that record Lydia Albro's expenditures from the 1870s into the 20th century for maintaining her house and property. The earliest manuscript among these papers records a charge for her schooling in 1842. A considerable number of bills document her purchases from Albro Bros. She consistently bought her coal and lumber from Oscar Conklin and then Dalrymple & Lindsey; hardware from the Voorhees Bros.; piping, brick, and other building materials from W.R. Bromfield & Co., plumbers and tinsmiths; and groceries from P.C. Henry. Lydia did business with local firms in Basking Ridge, Bernardsville, Morristown, Madisonville, and Peapack. Situated on the Lackawanna Railroad line, which ran trains into New York City, she had contacts there as well, making purchases from R.H. Macy and Sheppard Knapp, the proprietor of a carpet store. Of particular note are an 1881 invoice for Lydia's purchase of a bedroom ... Read More
Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library
Half of the collection is made up of receipts for Talcott's expenses during the 1800s. Money is spent on schooling, subscriptions, salt, flour, sugar, cloth, physicians, glass tumblers, china cups and saucers, a sewing machine, refined oil, a wide variety of textiles, and other things. Between 1816 and 1846, Talcott served as administrator of five different estates, keeping here the receipts for the distribution of the property. The balance of the collection consists of deeds, 1802-1815; some letters, 1826-1902; an undated TLS from Dorothy Canfield Fisher; a few poems; and a small number of other undated manuscripts
Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library
This collection contains journals, diaries, business papers, letters, rewards for students, broadsides, and hymnals from the South Union, KY Shaker community between 1758-1922. Items of note include an autobiography of John Rankin, Jr., "A Sketch of the Life and Experiences of Issachar Bates," a mill ledger, a seed-selling account book, and several hymnals by Mary Edwards and H.L. Eades
Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library
The collection, consisting of both business and family papers, documents the activities of the Ashton family of Philadelphia, including father John's carpentry business, the cabinetmaking activities of brothers Isaac and Samuel, and other family members and activities, from 1708 to 1876. The business papers consist of account books, daybooks, accounts, bills, receipts, and orders. Those relating to the cabinetmaking business of Samuel Ashton provide information on the relationship between journeymen and masters. These include boarding records and information on what was produced by whom, wages earned and spent, furniture forms, clientele, woods used, and sources of supplies. The records further demonstrate how the crafts of carpentry, coach making, and cabinetmaking would overlap
Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library
Consists of seven letters written by Hewitt to Matt Bruen in 1801 and 1802, along with an account book (on microfilm, Mic. 491)) kept by Hewitt from 1801 to 1812. The letters were sent from Savannah, Ga., where Hewitt was selling furniture consigned to him by Bruen, a fellow merchant and cabinetmaker. Hewitt writes requesting furniture be sent to him, including mahogany bedsteads, sets of dining tables with circular end tables, and inlaid oval breakfast tables. Hewitt comments on what is and is not selling, problems with shipments, and complains about not being paid. As well, there is a letter from William McCardell of Baltimore, written in 1829, mostly about Henry Preston (a.k.a. Henry Jones), a mulatto who had left McCardell before his term of indenture had expired. (Preston was not a slave for life; McCardell had bought him for a term of years, and Preston left before his term had expired.).
Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library
Collection primarily consists of manuscript and printed items documenting several inter-related Pennsylvania German families whose last names were Martin, Marberger, Albright, Albrecht, Kiefer, Faust, and Kimmel. Items such as letters, essays, bills, promissory notes, birth certificates, marriage certificates, indentures, bonds, and bank deposit receipts record aspects of their daily lives. A number of documents have to do with the administration of various estates. These include letters of administration, wills, inventories, accounts, appraisals, and broadsides advertising an estate vendue. Several wills were contested in court, and a variety of documents regarding legal proceedings are also present, including subpoenas, notes of trial proceedings, transcriptions of testimony, and a judge's verdict. Other adjudication involved unpaid bills, malicious words and threats, but most concerned land disputes. As well, there are deeds and land surveys relating to real estate matters. ... Read More
Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library
This collection contains primarily bills and receipts for personal and household goods and services purchased by members of the Wayne family of Pennsylvania between 1834-1891. Items bought include carpets, dry goods, seeds, stove pipes, furniture, jewelry, silverware, glassware, china, clothes, shoes, food, farm tools, books, magazine and newspaper subscriptions, wallpaper, wagon repairs, harnesses, lumber, hardware, property taxes, and household linens and utensils. Among the items mentioned that are of particular interest are a feather bed, clothestand, venetian carpet, a French sofa, stove pipes, a coach that had been painted and varnished, and various types of fabric including muslin, damask, silk, and calico. Some of the printed billheads have engravings of buildings, stoves, porcelain, farm tools, a coach factory, and logos like an arm and hammer. This collection also contains several personal and business letters, as well as two silhouettes of unknown members of the Wayne ... Read More