Lexington Historical Society
Correspondence, sermons, biographical materials, bills and receipts, and other papers, of members of the Hancock family -- Includes account (1748-1750) of Rev. John Hancock with Thomas Hancock, merchant and bookseller, in Boston, for goods purchased; two letters (1886 and undated) written by Thomas Minns to Rev. C.A. Staples relating to the Boston estate of Thomas Hancock and information on the tomb in Fairfield, Conn., of Mrs. Lydia Hancock, widow of Thomas Hancock; notes (2 v., 1690-1698), taken by Rev. John Hancock on discourses (sermons) delivered by Cotton Mather and others; biography (undated) of Rev. John Hancock; letters (ca. 15 items, chiefly 1740s) from Christopher Kilby (1705-1771), wealthy Boston merchant, written to Thomas Hancock and also other correspondence and papers of Kilby, concerning shipping and real estate ventures, including some details of the Louisbourg affair (1745); broadside concerning the death of Gov. John Hancock (1793 Oct. 8); election sermon preached ... Read More
State Library of Massachusetts
v. 1. 1628-1641. -- v. 2. 1642-1649. Volume 1 and 2 are in 1 v. ; v. 2 beginning on p. 295. The records 23 Feb. 1628-11 May 1629 consist of 25 unnumbered p.; prefixed to these is a portion (3 p.) of a letter from Matthew Craddock, Governor of the Company dated 16 Feb. 1628. -- Volume 3, missing. Consult State Archives. v. 4., pt. 1. 1650-1660. -- v. 4, pt. 2. 1661-1673. -- v. 5. 1674-1686
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Archives
Three successive provincial congresses served as the government of Massachusetts in opposition to the crown-appointed governor and council, before and during the outbreak of the Revolution. Proceedings are a daily account of their activities -- For political reasons they were considered confidential documents. Included are resolves and orders, procedural discussions, committee reports, and addresses and texts of pamphlets ordered to be published and circulated to Massachusetts towns. Secretaries maintaining records were Benjamin Lincoln (Oct. 1774-Apr. 1775), John Murray (Apr.-May 1775) and Samuel Freeman (May-July 1775)
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Archives
Series consists of various printed documents issued by the Massachusetts Loan Office, as found among the papers of the Massachusetts Treasurer and Receiver-General, with whose office it interacted -- Files include loan certificates and receipts for interest payments and for certificate transfers (transferring stock between individuals). There are also receipts relating to the payment of pensions for invalids (disabled soldiers), which the commissioner did twice a year, and occasional handwritten documents relating to office business
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Archives
Authorized in May 1779 (Resolves 1778-79, c 753), the position of State Clothier was established to expedite the distribution of clothing to Massachusetts soldiers in the Continental Army. Supplies from several sources were channeled to Massachusetts regiments through appointed regimental clothiers, who in turn distributed the clothing among the officers and soldiers. Series documents the transactions of state clothiers Samuel Ruggles (Sept. 1779-Oct. 1780) and Ezra Lunt (Oct. 1780-July 1782)
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Archives
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Archives
Initial arrangements for provisioning Massachusetts troops during the American Revolution began with the appointment in Feb. 1775 of John Pigeon as commissary of stores (later commissary general) by the Committee of Safety at the request of the Second Provincial Congress. This record of such provisioning was kept by Isaac Hall of Medford, who served as a deputy commissary under Pigeon, from Apr. 22 until Aug. 3, 1775, after which provisioning functions were taken over by the commissary of the Continental Army, Gen. Joseph Trumbull
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Archives
The committee was responsible for paying general state administrative services. Series includes bills for service on committees, service in state stores, express delivery of letters and small goods, signing legislation, rent and repairs to state property including the state yacht, government supplies, census work, mustering militia, fortifying the harbor, receiving and weighing flour, travel reimbursement, and for fees due clerks and other state employees
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Archives
Series includes bills for military support expenses such as carting and storage of food, rum, wood, metal supplies, baking of bread, labor, wharfage, sailmaking, boatwork, cooperage, carpentry, collecting blankets, clerk wages for state store, armorer services, and gunwork. Bills also include wood and carpentry expenses for the care and maintenance of various lighthouses
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Archives
Massachusetts passed a bounty law in 1801 (Resolves 1800, c 139, Mar. 5, 1801) granting payment of $20 or 200 acres to anyone having served in the Continental Army for 3 years or the duration of the war. Resolves 1829, c 52 (Feb. 18, 1829) allowed veterans who had not yet chosen land to chose from selected lots in the counties of Penobscot or Somerset or from Mars Hill township (Maine). Resolves 1833, c 88 (Mar. 27, 1833) granted $50 or 200 acres to soldiers (or widows) not previously receiving a bounty. Resolves 1835, c 49 (Mar. 12, 1835) provided a $50 payment to all soldiers who had served at least two years six months. Series consists of account books showing payments of bounty money and land issued to individuals -- Entries include soldier name, rank, residence, regiment, and receipt date for bounty money or land. Volumes A and B, one the draft of the other, list those receiving $20 bounties (per Resolves 1800) or $50 bounties (per Resolves 1833 or Resolves 1835). Volume C lists ... Read More

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