Allen County Public Library - Genealogy Center
Massachusetts Historical Society
Sixteen letters from artist and author Washington Allston to poet Henry Pickering
Massachusetts Historical Society
Diaries kept by portrait painter Sarah G. Putnam from the age of nine (26 November 1860) until near her death at the age of 61 (10 April 1912). The diaries document her career as a portrait painter, primarily in Boston, and her extensive travels for both study and pleasure to Europe and the southern and western U.S. Putnam also used the diaries as scrapbooks for programs, playbills, letters, postcards, and newspaper clippings, and lists of books read. Her career as an artist is documented through ink and pencil sketches and approximately 400 pasted-in watercolors, with lists and programs of her exhibited paintings
Getty Research Institute
The artist writes a friend, Buffalo, from his summer home in England, expressing regrets that he has no free evenings because he must use them to work on "some medals for the government" (Oct. 1, The Abbot's Grange, Broadway, Worcestershire). The other letter, from Bridgewater, Mass. (n.d.), informs his friend Ticknor that he will not be able to visit before April 25th because he was asked to lecture in Dorchester on the 22nd, and needs time to write the text
Getty Research Institute
The collection comprises 6 letters, all in photographic copies, pasted in an album. Five letters from 1768 to 1791 were copied from Edmund Burke's archive in Sheffield, England (11 photos). One letter from 1776 is addressed to the Director of the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. These 2 photos, loosely inserted, have the Uffizi archives stamp on the verso
Getty Research Institute
The collection comprises 10 brief letters and one print. Items of interest include Gavarni's statement of opposition to a judgement in favor of a Ermelin Frères pronouncement (1838 Feb. 5). Three letters were sent to Durelleray, "fabricant d'évantails": one recommends Miss Giskaro, who makes "du coloriage" and would like to offer her collaboration (1847 Jan.); the second informs his friend that he will take his advice (1866 July 4); the third reminds him of their dinner date (n.d.). Gavarni writes the buyer of the 17th century book Récréation mathématique, asking permission to take a look at it (n.d.). There are two letters by the son of the artist, Pierre Gavarni. He thanks a person who has offered him some volumes of his father's engravings which he did not have (1903 Apr. 9); and informs a collector that the few works of his father in his possession are kept for the family patrimony (1929 Dec. 16). The collection also comprises the print of Gavarni's bust portrait signed ... Read More
Getty Research Institute
Between Aug. 25 and Sept. 9, 1891 La Farge and Henry Adams took a voyage from Java to Singapore, towards the end of their travels in the South Seas. La Farge kept a record of the trip, which was published, except for this portion, as "Reminiscences of the South Seas" (1912). The diary records details which appealed to La Farge as a painter, and includes twenty-four sketches of dancers, four landscape drawings and six miscellaneous sketches
Getty Research Institute
Pasqui writes to bookbinder Antonio Fortunato Stella's widow, who he understands is compiling the biographies of prominent Italian artists of the period. He submits a lengthy and detailed history, beginning with his genealogy and including his training and understanding of the field, his romantic conception of the artist, and an overview of the artistic climate in Milan during the first quarter of the 19th century
Getty Research Institute
The collection documents Marcia Tucker's uniquely intertwined personal and professional activity from her work as a cataloger for private collections, to curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1968, through her retirement from the Founding Directorship of the New Museum in 2000. Museum files from the Whitney, comprising acquisitions, studio visits, interoffice memos, and minutes of meetings, reflect the institutional practices and aesthetic standards that Tucker ebulliently questioned. Her firing from the Whitney is portrayed in correspondence and clippings, as is her subsequent creation of an experimental institution, the New Museum. The evolution of Tucker's prescient, influential ideas about contemporary art, art exhibition, and museum management is evident in exhibition files, writings, lectures, and in her collection of writings by others
Getty Research Institute
In these two letters to the engraver Galeazzi, Baruzzi comments with great praise on the sculpture of the "Dancing Fawn" in the Villa Borghese and on the fashion of collecting antiquities