Northwestern University
Vortrag im Hotel Odeon zu Detmold ... 25. Juli 1922 --Dadaistische Wohnungskultur auf der Möbelmesse in Detmold -- Dada ist dadaismus -- Dada-Reklame-Gesellschaft
Smithsonian Institution - Archives of American Art
Research materials assembled by Phyllis Freeman, on the subject of 20th century artists' manifestos. Files include research correspondence, mss. drafts of the monograph (never published), "Manifestos in the Visual Arts: Programs and Movements Since 1900," and eight feet of subject files, covering movements and groups such as Abstract Expressionism, American Abstract Artists, Blaue Reiter, Die Brucke, Constructivism, Dadaism, Fluxus, Futurism, MA (Hungarian avant-garde), Mexican murals, Orphism, the Société Anonyme, De Stijl, and Vorticism
Getty Research Institute
This collection consists of unpublished letters and published and unpublished essays and phonetic poems by Raoul Hausmann and Richard Huelsenbeck. The typescripts contain corrections which frequently differ from the final published works. Together, the manuscripts and correspondence present the historical framework of the Dada movement. Also included are photocopies and photostats of letters received by Herwarth Walden, founder and editor of the magazine Der Sturm. Kleinschmidt collected these letters from the Sturm Archive in order to write a history of the magazine and its founder. The letters from artists and writers of the period give insight into the art developments of the early 20th century. Artists and writers included are Guillaume Apollinaire, Sonia Delaunay, Otto Freundlich, Albert Gleizes, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Fernand Leger, Adolf Loos, August Macke, Thomas Mann, Franz Marc, Walter Mehring and Max Pechstein
Getty Research Institute
Manifesto, in seven chapters, on Dada and the Dada movement
Getty Research Institute
With a printed design in ink by Jean Arp
Getty Research Institute
On the stationery of the journal Transition, Jolas discusses George Grosz and Hugo Ball, the whereabouts of Dada artists, and the destruction of the movement by political events in Germany
Getty Research Institute
Includes "Dada 1916-1923" (1953), "Magritte: Word vs Image" (1954) and "57 Collages: Kurt Schwitters" (1956). Expanding collection
Getty Research Institute
Files containing descriptive bibliographic, biographic and other information used in compiling the firm's printed catalogues. Alphabetically arranged. The Research Institute's library holds the full run of Holstein catalogues
University of Manitoba - Elizabeth Dafoe Library
Contains both source material and research results. Examples are: copies of correspondence by and about Greve and Else (née Ploetz, divorced Endell), 1901-1909; literary manuscripts, poems, autographed title pages, etc. by both parties, including 7 poems published under the joint pseudonym Fanny Essler in 1904/5. Documents discovered about Grove's "Bonanza Farm in the Dakotas" (March 1996), and Greve's long-elusive passage (found in October 1998) from Liverpool to Montreal on the White Star Liner "Megantic" in July 1909. -- Since these documents are the property of various European and North American archives, photocopying is generally prohibited. -- Various research papers by G. Divay about aspects of these source materials are part of this collection. -- Important items in this collection are individually catalogued, and regrouped under the series title: "Divay Research & Document collection.".
Getty Research Institute
The collection comprises thirty-seven letters written by eight artists to the art dealer Fleiss, answering his quest for original works from the Dada period. The correspondents are Serge Charchoune, Dunoyer de Segonzac, Leonor Fini, Félix Labisse, E.L.T. Mesens, Roland Penrose, Ribemont-Dessaignes and Christian Schad. These artists, now in the final stage of their careers, have little or nothing left to sell from that remote period of their beginnings. They also cannot offer information to Fleiss about other collectors, because they are no longer in touch with the old time Dada enthusiasts. The most successful, such as Serge Charchoune and Christian Schad, have already retained their Dada creations for various exhibitions in this revival period. When they agree to sell, the prices are high and they do not agree to bargain: "Je ne crois pas que les objets d'art sont des merchandises," writes Schad. Those who have works by other painters in their collections would hardly sell them. ... Read More