College of Charleston - Marlene and Nathan Addlestone Library
Negatives, slides, digital images, and other papers of Paula Kornblum Popowski, a Polish-born Jew who survived the Holocaust by passing as a Christian. Materials include pre- and post-war photographs of Popowski and her family and friends, photographs of locations where Popowski lived in Poland and Germany, and her false Polish identification papers. Other materials include postcards and letters sent to Popowski, mostly after the war
College of Charleston - Marlene and Nathan Addlestone Library
The collection consists of manuscripts, correspondence, interviews on videocassette and DVD, photographs, and other papers of Rudolf Rudy Herz, a native of Stommeln, Germany, who survived incarceration in Theresienstadt, Auschwitz, and other concentration camps during World War II. After immigrating to the United States in 1946, he served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War
Columbia University
Born 1918 in the Netherlands; Career: economic counselor, Netherlands representative to the UN, representative to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), visiting Scholar at Columbia University, Dutch Ambassador to Japan. Themes: Personal experience of the Holocaust, intellectual heritage of the Great Depression, impact of the Marshall Plan, General Agreements on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), effects of the Cold War on American and Dutch bilateral relations, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), work on the Institute for Social Development, role of Non-Governmental Organizations in negotiation, American position in the UN, Israeli-Egyptian dynamics, evolution of the UN over time, role of global conferences in intellectual development, introduction of ideas into the UN
Jewish Museum of Maryland
Mansbach family papers contain records that document the family's attempts to flee Nazi Germany and establish themselves in England and finally the United States -- Papers include correspondence, affadivits, immigration documents, and identity documents. Family members include Bernhard Mansbach (1900-1981); his brothers, Leo Mansbach and Edmund Mansbach (b. 1896) who died in a concentration camp; parents Hermann Mansbach and Sophie (Loewenstein) Mansbach; and wife, Hertha (Phillips) Mansbach (1905-1996). Other persons include George Mansbach, of Baltimore, Md., who was not related bu provided assistance to Bernard Mansbach when he emigrated to the United States
Holocaust Center of Northern California
Survivor testimony of Hofeller -- Describes childhood in Munich, Germany, high school in Nazi Germany, increasing antisemitism, "Entartete Kunst" (Degenerate Art) exhibition, Kristallnacht, emigration and experiences in Switzerland, family in Germany; traveling as a refugee to Lisbon, Ellis Island, Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic), and the U.S.
American Jewish Archives
Correspondence, memoranda, newsclippings, speeches, press releases, and printed material relating to Lemkin's crusade for the adoption of an international law making genocide a crime; together with materials on the Nuremberg trials and the Nobel Peace Prize
Holocaust Center of Northern California
Transcripts of letters, including one intended for his parents in Terezin which was smuggled out of Auschwitz. In the letter, he dramatically pleads for them to spare themselves the fate that has befallen him -- Also includes a letter to Kraus from Honzu Munk (a possible friend?) describing conditions in Auschwitz, and a memoir written by Munk, describing his mother's suicide
American Jewish Archives
Topics include National Federation of Temple Youth (later name: North American Federation of Temple Youth), Zionism, antisemitism, Jewish holocaust, interfaith relations, African American and Jewish relations, Reform Judaism, displaced persons of World War II in Europe, Palestine, Israel, charities, education, and rabbis. Persons represented include Dwight D. Eisenhower, Loy W. Henderson, Judah Leon Magnes, Allen Howard Podet, and Harry S. Truman
Holocaust Center of Northern California
Survivor testimony of Jungren -- Describes how his mother and sisters were sent to Auschwitz; his father to Mauthausen. Jungren was sent to Buchenwald, and compelled to perform forced labor in Germany repairing railway lines. He was liberated at Dachau. Ultimately he emigrated to the U.S.

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