University of Illinois Urbana Champaign
Scope and Contents Papers of Melissa G. Stidham (1885-1954) '21, A.M. '25, including letters sent to Gordon Brooks (1930-36, 1939-43, 1946-57) and letters from Joe Stidham, her brother, (1957-60) to Brooks about students, family, neighbors, developers, and trespassers; conservation, wildlife and timber; farming; animals, birds and flowers; literature and Henry Thoreau; painting and music; Lake of the Woods and Mahomet, IL; Brooklyn and New York, NY; rural life and travel; strikes and capitalism; World War II; pacifism and health.
University of Illinois Urbana Champaign
Scope and Contents Typewritten Descriptions of Courses Offered in the Department of Art and Design, including freehand drawing, light and shade, cast drawing, still life and flower painting, landscape and portrait painting, modeling, pen-rendering and etching, applied design, perspective, color and history and criticism. Reproductions of plates representing the work in courses are included.
Center for the Study of Upper Midwestern Cultures
The Minnesota Folk Arts Program (Philip Nusbaum) Collection primarily contains photographic images, video, and sound recordings of well over 350 Minnesota folk artists and traditional musicians that resulted from John Berquist's and mainly Philip Nusbaum's tenure as Folk Arts Program associates at the Minnesota State Arts Board (1983-2003). Reaching back to 1959 and including collaborations with numerous folklorists in the region, materials relate to the Minnesota Traditional Music Series of commercial recordings, Minnesota Folk Arts radio shows, folk artist directories, apprenticeship and folklore sponsorship grant programs, festival demonstrations and performances, and teaching programs. Minnesota's diverse ethnic make-up is especially featured, including indigenous Ojibwas and older and newer immigrant groups from North and Central America, northern, western, and eastern Europe, the Mediterranean and Middle East, Africa, and Asia. Besides an emphasis on musical traditions from ... Read More
Getty Research Institute
To an unidentified correspondent regarding a royalty payment
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Among the seven letters included in the collection are one letter to the Comte de Forbin (January 1821) and three letters to Guérin's friend Durandeau (1822-1825) giving accounts of his travels in Italy and discussing commissions and personal business. In a four-page undated essay titled "Sur le génie" Guérin argues that in painting, a powerful theme conveyed with simplicity is the salient quality of all works of genius; he cites Poussin's "Déluge" as an example. The collection also includes a bill of sale (December 1833) signed by Guérin's executor P. David, for the contents of Guérin's studio to Léon Cogniet
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The collection comprises study photographs and negatives assembled by art dealer Julius H. Weitzner. Eighty percent of the photographs are standard commercial prints (from Brogi/Alinari) of paintings in museums and public buildings in Florence (e.g., Uffizi, Pitti, Palazzo Vecchio, Palazzo Medici Riccardi, San Marco). All but a few of the remaining photos depict paintings exhibited elsewhere in Italy, in Milan, Pisa, Rome, Turin, etc. The majority of the artists represented are Italian. A number of the photos are duplicates. The negatives are of European old master paintings of all schools: Dutch, English, Flemish, French, German, Italian, and Spanish
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In a letter to an unidentified patron (Sep 3, 1779), Vien discusses a painting he is working on. A letter to the painter Fr. Xavier Fabre (Aug. 1, 1791), concerns payment for a painting sent to the Société des amis des arts
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To "Madame la Comtesse" in Vienna revealing his ambitions and present frustrations
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Deveria discusses in great detail the conception of his painting of Ste. Clotilde and its origins. There is also mention of the gracious patronage of Louis Philippe
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To a Mr. Gidding, explaining that he will not exhibit in the Sturm gallery with the "Weimar group" and claiming that Dutch art is more advancced in concept than current art in Germany. He also mentions his disagreement with J.J.P. Oud