Wisconsin Historical Society Library and Archives
Color transparencies from the department's "duplicate and dormant" photograph file, primarily documenting Wisconsin tourist attractions and scenery during the late 1960s and early 1970s. A few images relate to the department's general responsibilities for natural resource management -- Among the most documented categories are scenery, especially in Door County; tourist attractions and events such as Aqualand, Circus World Museum, the Milwaukee Folk Fair, the "Song of Norway" festival, Villa Louis, and the Wisconsin Dells; state parks; waterways; and outdoor recreation such as boating, camping, fishing, deer and duck hunting, skiing, and snowmobiling. The majority of these images were photographed by Dale Tvedt and Stabler W. Reese
Minnesota Historical Society
Color transparencies of the illustrations used in the book Minnesota Collects, c1992 by the Minnesota Historical Society
Johns Hopkins University - Milton S. Eisenhower Library
This collection includes at least 430 photographic color transparencies of pages of the Gold Koran. Created from photographing the sides of each page of the partial illuminated manuscript, these transparencies measure 4x5". The portion of the Gold Koran is a vellum bifolio, written in Kufic script in gold leaf, and outlined with black ink. Vocalizations are indicated by red and blue dots. Each folio is framed by decorative border containing intricate interlace patterns, and features a decorative leafy vignette in the outer margin. It was likely bound in the 18th century. The text is as follows and contains 18 suras, or chapters, only approximately half of the completed religious text: Folio 1a LII Sura al-Tur (the Mount), verses 37-49 Folio 1b LIII Sura al-Najm (the Star), verses 1-21 Folio 2a LIV Sura al-Qamar (the Moon), verses 13-27 Folio 2b LIV Sura al-Qamar (the Moon), verses 27-40. The original complete manuscript was written in around 800, while this portion was bound in ... Read More
Wisconsin Historical Society Library and Archives
Autochrome and Dufay natural color transparencies of the countryside near Madison, Wisconsin, and of University of Wisconsin buildings, 1912-1915, including Sunset Point, Lake Mendota, Yahara River, Eagle Hill and agricultural buildings. Chiefly of phototechnical interest. The Autochrome process, the first practical direct color photography process to be commercially available, was introduced generally in 1906
Minnesota Historical Society
Views of Minnesota buildings, churches, stained glass windows, bridges, construction sites, lakes, and outdoor scenes taken with a Kodak Stereo camera. Featured urban areas include the Twin Cities and Duluth
Dartmouth College - Rauner Special Collections Library
The collection contains 140 Kodak stereo transparencies documenting the U.S. Navy's construction of the Amundsen Scott South Pole Station in 1955-1956, in preparation for the International Geophysical Year, 1957-1958 -- Also included are images of McMurdo Station, the South Pole and other Antarctic landscapes, dog sleds and other means of transportation, camps, and various fauna
Harvard University - Harvard University Archives
These transparencies document the destruction of the Memorial Hall tower
Wisconsin Historical Society Library and Archives
Color transparencies from the department's “duplicate and dormant” photograph file, primarily documenting Wisconsin tourist attractions and scenery. A few images relate to the department's general responsibilities for natural resource management. The majority of these images were photographed by Dale Tvedt, Stabler W. Reese, and Norval Barger Jr.