Smithsonian Libraries
Dugmore first experienced the war as a civilian, crossing over to Belgium in August 1914. His love of photography caused him to be suspected as a spy by the British on one occasion and the Belgians soon after. Once captured by the Germans, he escaped only to be badly injured afterwards. Upon his recovery he joined the forces, securing a commission in the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. Badly gassed at the Battle of the Somme, his talents as a public speaker and on the lecture rostrum were put to use with the blessing of the Foreign Office
Smithsonian Libraries
A group of 4 x 100 ft. 16mm black and white films, and one smaller color film showing North American scenes including wildlife, and scenes of London
Brooklyn Museum
Cleveland Museum of Art - Ingalls Library
Smithsonian Libraries
An extensive collection of over 30 items, plus duplicates, of ephemeral items relating to Dugmore and his work. Included are announcements of lectures and programs, certificates of membership in various societies, agreements with publishers, catalogs of exhibitions, newspaper articles, photographs and menus of dinners (some signed)
Smithsonian Libraries
This novel appears to be based on Dugmore's own experiences and the success of his earlier published work, Two boys in beaver land (1920)
Smithsonian Libraries
Depicts the artist Dugmore lying on the ground in front of his camera, with an elephant towering above him, with two smaller elephants visible in the background. This illustration was reproduced in an article on elephant hunting and depicts an incident that was one of the author's favorite stories during his lectures
Smithsonian Libraries
A draft of a novel about the war-time romance and marriage of a British soldier with artistic talent -- This novel was previously entitled "His Friend Peter" and it is under this title that the accompanying criticism by R.H. Ambrose deals with the work. "This is a remarkably good attempt at fiction. Indeed, I am of the opinion that the author has a definite flair for work of this kind. The construction of the story is good, the unraveling of the 'plot' very well achieved and the reader's attention held to the end, all good features. Unfortunately much of the work is now out of date and although quite an amount of the script could be retained (subject to revision of unnecessarily prolonged scenes), the story would have to be brought up to date before submission to publishers. This would entail modernizing and re-writing at least 50% of the manuscript. I hope the author will undertake this, for there is undoubted talent in the script.".