Western Washington University - Heritage Resources
The Waterfront Oral History Project records consist of interviews and related materials generated through a 2006 oral history project involving students at Western Washington University -- Records date from 1926 up to the completion of the project in 2006. The collection contains interviews with current and former employees of the Georgia-Pacific Corporation's (GP) pulp mill in Bellingham, Washington (formerly owned and operated by the Puget Sound Pulp & Timber Company). Interviewees discuss topics including the history of the mill site, plant operations and equipment, job descriptions, research projects, technological innovations within the pulping industry, as well as a wide variety of mill operations. The oral histories also document relations between GP management, its employees, and the Association of Western Pulp and Paper Workers union, as well as the relationship between the mill, the surrounding community, and Western Washington University. Interview files and student ... Read More
University of Virginia
Additional records of the Virginia Oral History Association consisting of index cards with member names, applications for membership, conference-workshop registration forms, and letters to Charles E. Moran, Chairman, Steering Committee, VOHA, Manuscripts Department, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville
Minnesota Historical Society
Interviews with members of the Khmer community in Minnesota about their experiences in Cambodia under the leadership of the Khmer Rouge, 1975-1979, their experiences in refugee camps, and their emigration to the United States. INTERVIEWEES: Monoram Hang, Chemreun Tan, Sova Niev, Samphoun Em, Sok Yorm, Phorm Phuong, Choup Lat, Seng Prom, Y Nor, Lar Munstock, Loeung Bun, Channy Som, Yoeuth Yan, Henry Nelson, Khon Kong, Thaly Chhour
Kentucky State Archives Guide Project
These are interviews with residents of the Trimble County, Kentucky area
Kentucky State Archives Guide Project
The Commission's holdings include county history interviews conducted by volunteers and project interviews collected primarily through the Commission's grant program. These projects include those concerning Governor Lawrence Wetherby, World War II Bataan survivors, the tobacco industry, rural health care, and Vietnam veterans
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Interviews by Kelly Navies explore the history of Stephens-Lee High School in Asheville, N.C. Built in 1923, Stephens-Lee was for many decades western North Carolina's only secondary school for African Americans. The school drew students from Buncombe, Henderson, Madison, Yancey, and Transylvania counties, and represented a focal point and a key source of pride for the extended African American community in the state's western region
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Interviews exploring church history and Christian life in North Carolina with a particular focus on African American denominations, race relations, and civil rights activism within church communities
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Interviews by Rob Amberg document the construction of a nine-mile section of Interstate 26. Amberg explored the history of daily life in the once isolated community of eastern Madison County and considered the consequences of highway development on community interaction and sense of place. Interviewees include the county sheriff; a probation officer; an environmental activist; the resident highway engineer of the I-26 Corridor project; self-described hippies who moved to Madison County in the early 1970s to live off the land; the mayor of Mars Hill, N.C.; and the town manager of Mars Hill, N.C.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Interviews with flood victims, rescue workers, relief workers, ministers, farmers, farm workers, small-business owners, environmental monitors, and political leaders in eastern North Carolina about the devastating flooding in the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd. In the fall of 1999, soon after the flood, the Southern Oral History Program set out to document the catastrophe and to assess the environmental, political, and economic consequences of the disaster, as well as its impact on individual lives. Many broad themes emerged from the interviews: the sweeping toll of the flood on human lives; the disruptions to community and sense of place; the character of political response to the disaster at local, state, and national levels; public health and environmental issues arising from the flooding; the effect of the disaster on the region's most vulnerable residents, including children, the elderly, and lower-income families, and the experiences of relief workers. Interviews by Jay Barnes for ... Read More
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Interviews conducted by Pamela Grundy as part of her research for a book on North Carolina athletics, "Learning to Win: Sport, Education and Social Change in Twentieth-Century North Carolina" (University of North Carolina Press, 2001). The interviews with John McLendon and James Ross deal largely with African American sport during segregation