Yale University
Kroeber conducted field work with several Klamath River groups, including the Karok, Wiyot, and Yurok Indians; the Yokuts Indians of Central California; with Ishi, the last member of the Yahi band of the Sacramento Valley; the Mohave Indians of the Colorado River region; and the Zuni Indians of New Mexico, among many other groups. He also carried out archaeological field work in Mexico and Peru. He published more that 500 books and articles on anthropological topics, and served as an expert witness in the Indian land claims cases Clyde F. Thompson et. al. v. United States, Docket No. 31, and Ernest Risling et. al. v. United States, Docket 37
University of Arizona
Correspondence, manuscripts of published and unpublished works, notes, drawings, notebooks, sermons, prayers, and historical accounts relate to Haile's study of Navajo ceremonials and the Navajo language. Includes correspondence with church officials and anthropologists; manuscripts, notes, and drawings related to Navajo language, culture and ceremonials; interlinear Navajo-English notebooks; accounts of the founding and early history of the Lukachukai and St. Michaels Missions; and sermons, prayers, etc. from Haile's teaching in these missions. Also present is material from the Interpreters' Institute at Fort Wingate, New Mexico, 1935; the Navajo constitution and related papers; reprints of articles by other authors about the Navajo; and related material on Apache and Zuni Indians. Selected correspondents include Gladys Reichard, Edward Sapir, Clyde Kluckhohn, Anselm Weber, and Leopold Ostermann, as well as government officials, missionary organizations, and Navajo individuals
Museum of New Mexico
The collection consists of photographic images produced by Matilda Coxe Stevenson circa 1890s through 1900. They depict ceremonial activities and daily life in the pueblos of Zuni and Sia (Zia). All photos were made with a Kodak No. 2 camera. Subject references made by the photographer are to the Annual Reports of the Bureau of American Ethnology to which the photos are keyed. There is no acquisition history for this collection however HP. 1984.15 and HP. 1984.24 contained photos which are more than likely incorporated in this collection
Autry National Center - Museum of the American West
Frank Hamilton Cushing (1857-1900) was an early ethnographer working in the American Southwest during the late 19th Century. The items contained in this collection include correspondence, reports, unpublished manuscripts, diaries, Zuni vocabulary cards, newspaper clippings, and magazine articles. These documents focus on Cushing's stay at Zuni Pueblo from 1879-1884, the Hemenway Southwestern Archaeological Expedition 1887-1889, and the Pepper Hearst Archeological Expedition 1896-1897. The bulk of the material in this collection was created between 1848 and 1923
Museum of New Mexico
Collection consists of materials resulting from ethnological research conducted, directed, and later administered by Clyde Kluckhohn in the Ramah, New Mexico, vicinity. Series I consists of typed or mimeographed field notes of the Ramah Project, arranged by subject and containing data on agriculture, education, labor, child development, and other topics. Includes photographs taken by Kluckhohn (1923-1936), and others (1923-1946). Series II consists of field journals from a long-range interdisciplinary study directed by Clyde Kluckhohn and coordinated by John M. Roberts and Evon Z. Vogt. The journals are arranged by culture group, then by subject according to the "Outline of Cultural Materials Index". Culture groups represented in the data include Mormons, Hispanic Americans, Texas homesteaders, Zuni Indians, and Navajo Indians. Series III consists of copies of field notes, field journals, interview transcripts and tests compiled by Robert M. Rapoport, a researcher on the Five Cultures ... Read More
Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
This group of material consists of seven packets of notes and material, including photographs, that Campbell created for a series of lectures about the history and Indians of the American Southwest. The titles of the lectures are: The Indians; Spanish Explorers; The Indian Pueblos of New Mexico; Stories about the Pueblo Indians; The Conquest of New Mexico and the Mexican Settlers; The American Occupation; and Texas and Arizona. The lectures discuss the following subjects: the Acoma, Laguna, Navajo, Pueblo and Zuni Indians; Arizona history; California history; New Mexico history; Texas history; and Taos Pueblo. Campbell also uses material written by Mary Hunter Austin and Charles Fletcher Lummis in her lectures. The photographs are of Southwest Indians and landscapes
Indiana University - Archives of Traditional Music
Reel 1: Introductions -- Laura Boulton speaks concerning her instrument collection -- Nasser Rastegadnejad [i.e. Rastegar-Nejad] speaks about the santur, its tuning, and the musical tones found in Arabic music -- Musical selection played on the santur. Reel 2: Sam Chianis speaks about the cymbalom [i.e. cimbalom] -- Dance for cimbalom and dumbek -- General comments on the music -- Klephtiko for cimbalom solo -- Fast piece for cimbalom and dombak -- Concluding remarks by Laura Boulton
University of California, Berkeley
A.L. Kroeber conducted field work with several Klamath River groups, including the Karok, Wiyot, and Yurok Indians; the Yokuts Indians of Central California; with Ishi, the last member of the Yahi band of the Sacramento Valley; the Mohave Indians of the Colorado River region; and the Zuni Indians of New Mexico, among many other groups. He also carried out archaeological field work in Mexico and Peru. He published more that 500 books and articles on anthropological topics, and served as an expert witness in the Indian land claims cases Clyde F. Thompson et. al. v. United States, Docket No. 31, and Ernest Risling et. al. v. United States, Docket 37
Yale University
Bound diary of the first 20 months of Winslow's participation in the Mexican War (41 p.). Winslow describes Santa Fe, various manoeuvers around present-day New Mexico, expeditions to find and fight Indians suspected of stealing cattle, a march to present-day Arizona where they were housed and fed by the Zuni Indians, and the invasion of Mexico and the description of the battle at Santa Cruz. The diary also contains a 3 page table of distances headed, "From Independence to Santa Fe," a 3 page list of officers, crew, and passengers of the Josephine with a daily log of latitude, longitude, and ships encountered from January 25 to June 27, 1849 (8 p.). Includes list of cities visited and date he arrived there, 2 of them after his arrival in California: Pueblo de San Jose Jan. 1, 1850, and Sacramento City, May 1, 1850
University of Arizona
Correspondence, diary, photographs, deeds, articles and speeches chiefly relating to Arizona territorial military experiences of Oury family members. Includes William Oury's address to the Society of Arizona Pioneers, 1885, regarding the Camp Grant Massacre; and letters to his daughter relating events in Tucson, 1883-1885; as well as items pertaining to Granville Oury's Civil War service with the Confederate Army and a letter from Sylvester Mowry to Granville from an 1860 political convention. Gilbert C. Smith materials consist of his diary, 1857-1856; letters to relatives while serving with the California Volunteers in Arizona, 1862- 1863; a letterbook kept while at Fort Lowell. Photographs, chiefly of army officers, but also family members and Zuni Indians, 1862-1894; military commissions; and annotated articles from "Frontier Times", 1928-1933. Also included are four photocopies of early land transactions involving George, August, and Wendell Oury in Virginia and Texas