Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Archives
Video footage of Artmobile mural painting in progress and brief interview with the Artmobile mural artist and designer Paul Whitehead
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Archives
The collection documents the service of Eda Carter Williams to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Williams was nominated to be a Trustee of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in 1954, and served for 11 years until 1965. She was also a founding member of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Council in 1955 and served on the Council for 45 years, until 2000
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Archives
This collection documents a small portion of the dynamic life of Leslie Cheek, Jr., the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts' second and longest-tenured Director (1948-1968). One series includes material from his early career and activities before the VMFA, as well as his tenure at the museum, and through his active retirement. Two series document the publication of two photobiographies about Cheek, "Living by Design" and "Designing for the Arts." Another series is comprised of materials about Skylark Farm, the house and tree farm located in the Blue Ridge Mountains, owned, designed and furnished by the Cheeks between 1967 and 1977 when it was donated to Washington and Lee University. Other series document the Cheeks' personal world travels in the 1950s-1980s, some of Cheek's many achievement awards, and finally, a number of framed architectural drawings done by Cheek as a student in the 1930s.
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Archives
This collection documents a small portion of the dynamic life of Leslie Cheek, Jr., the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts? second and longest-tenured Director (1948-1968). One series includes material from his early career and activities before the VMFA, as well as his tenure at the museum, and through his active retirement. Two series document the publication of two photobiographies about Cheek,?Living by Design? and?Designing for the Arts.? Another series is comprised of materials about Skylark Farm, the house and tree farm located in the Blue Ridge Mountains, owned, designed and furnished by the Cheeks between 1967 and 1977 when it was donated to Washington & Lee University. Other series document the Cheeks? personal world travels in the 1950s-1980s, some of Cheek?s many awards, and finally, a number of framed architectural drawings done by Cheek while he was still in school in the 1930s
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Archives
The collection documents the formation of the Lillian Thomas Pratt Collection of Fabergé decorative artworks at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Bequeathed to the museum upon her death in 1947, Pratt's Fabergé collection consistently remains one of the highlights of the museum's permanent collection. Pratt purchased most of her Fabergé collection from the Schaffer Collection and Hammer Galleries, both of New York City, in the 1930s and 1940s. Comprised of correspondence, invoices, price tags, and detailed item descriptions, this collection illuminates Pratt's mind as a collector, as well as her relationship with one of her dealers, Alexander Schaffer.
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Archives
The collection documents the formation of the Lillian Thomas Pratt Collection of Fabergé decorative artworks at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Bequeathed to the museum upon her death in 1947, Pratt's Fabergé collection consistently remains one of the highlights of the museum's permanent collection. Pratt purchased most of her Fabergé collection from the Schaffer Collection and Hammer Galleries, both of New York City, in the 1930s and 1940s. Comprised of correspondence, invoices, price tags, and detailed item descriptions, this collection illuminates Pratt's mind as a collector, as well as her relationship with one of her dealers, Alexander Schaffer
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Archives
Video footage of work being conducted on the museum's Grove Avenue entrance gate by artist Albert Paley item no: 85.10
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Archives
The collection documents the history of R.E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, a large residential complex for poor and infirm Confederate veterans of the Civil War. Altogether a total of nearly three thousand veterans from thirty-three states called the camp home, and after the camp's closing, the Commonwealth eventually granted use of the buildings and land to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. The collection is comprised of photographs and postcards that document the changing landscape of the camp over 50 years, a rare guest register that includes thousands of guest signatures and a page signed by ten members of the Blackfeet Nation, and two extremely rare artifacts – reunion ribbons – provide material testimony to the reconciliation efforts of Confederate and Union veterans only twenty years after they faced each other as enemies during the Civil War.
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Archives
The collection documents the rich history of Richmond's artistic culture and community in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Drawing upon the legacy of the first Academy of Fine Arts in the United States, founded in Richmond in 1786, the Richmond Academy of Arts was revived in 1930, and records created throughout the organization's history comprise the majority of the collection. The Academy provided the most cohesive and active arts organization in Richmond before the founding of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Even after the museum's opening in 1936, the relationship between the Academy and the museum is notable; from the correspondence between Thomas C. Colt, the museum's first Director, and two Presidents of the Academy, to the creation of Richmond's first "Salon des Refuses," and to the repeated overlapping of artist and patron names within the organizations.