University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
Secretary of the Interior Ray Lyman Wilbur came to Las Vegas to drive a silver spike inaugurating construction of the Union Pacific railroad branch line from Boulder Junction (aka Bracken) outside Las Vegas to the Boulder City townsite on Sept. 17, 1930. This ceremony is claimed by some to mark the beginning of Hoover Dam construction. It was also during this ceremony that Ray Lyman Wilbur first called the dam Hoover. This footage opens with workmen crafting the mallet which Wilbur used to drive the spike, and includes scenes of Wilbur's arrival in Las Vegas, the driving of the spike, panoramas of crowds at Boulder Junction who attended the ceremony, and laying the first rails to Boulder City
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
Continuation of interview recorded on November 10, 1986. Discusses the construction of Hoover Dam and Boulder City, Nevada
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
Casino area of the Boulder Club. Transcribed from original: "Inside the old Boulder Club on Fremont St. Now part of the Horseshoe taken from the bar area looking East. In the front Louise (Goble) Meehan, change girl.".
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
Collection consists of correspondence between J.K.W. Bracken and Bruce M. Barnard Co. regarding the purchase of Native American (Navajo) rugs and blankets. It also contains some invoices, and descriptions of the design significance of the individual rugs
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
A hotel room in the third tower of the Flamingo Hilton
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
Form 30 of San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad Company. Expense request submitted on July 1, 1909 by W. H. Bancroft, signed by J. Ross Clark; approved by E. G. Tilton on July 12, 1909. All signatures are stamped. Request is approval of funds to construct 20 four-room and 20 five-room employee cottages. The cottages were built by the Las Vegas Land and Water Company for employees of the San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad. This initial request for construction of 40 dwellings would be followed by 24 more for a total of 64. E. G. Tilton was the chief engineer for the San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad Company. W. H. Bancroft was the first vice president of the San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad Company. J. Ross Clark was the second vice president of the San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad Company
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
J.R.C.-4Z.C.M.I., Salt Lake City, amounting to $290.18 and $375.60, respectively.The tissue book containing impression copies of Dr. Bracken's orders showed that he had just placed orders for goods,value of which would amount to something over $2000.00, this including potatoes, flour and oats in carload lots, this in addition to the invoices amounting to $1500.00 just mentioned.No record had "been kept of the cattle killed in each month, eitherthe number or the weight, but from a tally kept on a post at the corral Dr.Bracken informed me that 111 had been killed since he first took charge ofthe property.Until about two months ago the cattle were killed by the ranch employees, but of late they have been slaughtered and dressed by Mr. Tuck, a butcher who receives one cent per pound for his services.The dressed beef is weighed and from the sales of beef during the day is taken the amount in cash due the butcher. The net receipts account of beef sold during the past ten months was ... Read More
University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
The UNLV School of Architecture and the Klai Juba Lecture series welcomes award-winning author and professor John S. Reynold, whose publications include Courtyard: aesthetic, social, and thermal delight, and Mechanical electrical equipment for building. Reynolds emphasizes the importance of courtyard sustainability and uses examples from cultures around the world. Reynolds, a resident of Eugene, Oregon compares the North American grid-like city to the plan of Colima, a Spanish settled city located in the Pacific Coast of Mexico. Reynolds believes that courtyards have the ability to make life better for the habitants of the household which in turn makes the residents proud of where they live. European cities frequently use spaces such as plazas (public spaces that are free of cars). Reynolds takes a look into the city planning of Cordova, Spain through aerial photographs, which indicates how important courtyards are to the residents as well as the culture. Reynolds researches a ... Read More