Minnesota Historical Society
Registers of probate actions (1875-1985), registers of criminal actions (1960-1985), and registers of civil actions (1960-1982). Some volumes are labeled county or municipal court. All volumes are indexed
Minnesota Historical Society
Clerk's books (1886-1901, 1955-1957), treasurer's books (1877-1944, 1955-1957), treasurer's annual reports (1889-1902), attendance registers (1887-1909), teacher's term reports (1889, 1891), librarian's record (1922-1931), and special textbook report (1894)
Connecticut Historical Society
An address made by John Keymer to King James I. Hand calligraphied on vellum, one of the points Keymer was trying to make to the King was that English fisheries were more worthwhile than the voyages the King was sponsoring to Virginia
Connecticut Historical Society
Letter written by Horace Greeley in New York to James F. Babcock
Connecticut Historical Society
Justice docket of Mark Harrison from courts he presided over in Southington and Wolcott, Connecticut. Includes a list of marriages
Connecticut Historical Society
Anonymous description of a trip into the Olympic Mountains in western Washington State to hunt bear and deer, undertaken by a small group of men, one of whom, the author, was from Hartford, Connecticut. Pictures have been affixed to the narrative, and several loose photographs are identified on a separate piece of paper. There is also a black and white postcard of two men in uniforms worn during World War I.
Connecticut Historical Society
The Gridley family lived in Farmington, Connecticut. The earliest document is a will written by Timothy Gridley in 1806, in which he mentions his children, including one named Mark. Mark had a son Ira who wrote letters to his family, beginning in 1830, as he explored the west, through Vermont, New York, Illinois and Wisconsin, looking for work and some land to buy for farming. At every turn he encountered bad luck. Each letter is filled with descriptions of what he sees, how his health is, and the names of people he knows, evidently family or friends. He also encourages his sister to follow the lead of some families from Meriden, Connecticut and move to Louisa County, Wisconsin. He also complained about the shortage of women. Ira's last letter is dated 1837; he died in 1838. The final letter is written to Mark Gridley by his niece, E.S. Hurd, living in Brownington, Vermont, filled with family news
Connecticut Historical Society
An eight-stanza poem written and penned by Lydia Sigourney celebrating Wisconsin's admission into the Union. In a postscript at the end, she notes that in its constitution Wisconsin extended the franchise to the Indians within its borders
Connecticut Historical Society
Cemetery inscriptions
Connecticut Historical Society
Genealogical notes and research