Tennessee State Library and Archives
Lieutenant Thomas Branson Cooke, C. S. A., taken in Nashville at age 16. He was killed two years later at the Battle of Port Hudson. His parents lived on Gallatin Pike in Nashville, Tennessee
Tennessee State Library and Archives
Governor Andrew Johnson describes the exchange of prisoners and commissions ex-Governor William B. Campbell to "examine and describe the terms and conditions" of the prisoner exchange
Tennessee State Library and Archives
Certificate of service for Pvt. William Jackson, Co. B, 1st Tenn. Cav. Regt., USA. Jackson enlisted on April 9, 1862. He was discharged from service on April 10, 1865, in Nashville, Tenn. He died in 1910 and is buried at Dry Valley Cemetery in Grainger County, Tenn
Tennessee State Library and Archives
Cabinet card image of Confederate veteran Isaac A. Shoun (1843-1923), seated on a wooden bench. Shoun was a sergeant in the 13th Tenn. Cav. Regt., CSA. He would have been around 67 years old at the time the photograph was taken. Shoun is buried at the Shoun-McEwen Family Cemetery, located on Campbell Road in Mountain City, Tennessee
Tennessee State Library and Archives
Scrap of a military record denoting the first names of negro enlistments in Colored Infantry Regiments. Also mentioned are some officers with the units. The notation of Gallatin and the date of 1863 most probably is associated with the formation of the 40th Colored Infantry or a mistaken date reference to their later Gallatin service, since the 42nd was not authorized to form until 1864. The reference to the 41st Colored Infantry is puzzling, since the 41st was comprised of Pennsylvannia men
Tennessee State Library and Archives
The canteen has the initials of the soldier on the spout "ADH" scratched into the spout on one side and the initials "AH" scored into the other side of the spout. The model 1858 canteen was standard issue for Federal soldiers. They were issued with a wool; covering, now missing from this example. The cork with chain and cotton sling are typical of the era. Photographic evidence indicates that Confederate soldiers also used canteens of this style captured from Federal soldiers
Tennessee State Library and Archives
John Ross (J. R.) Carson of Washington County, Tenn. Swore his oath to "support and defend the CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES AND UNION OF THE STATES thereunder" and would support the laws made "during the existing Rebellion with reference to the; EMANCIPATION OF SLAVES." It was signed by John T. Smith, Justice of the Peace. A copy print of John Ross Carson later in life accompanies this document
Tennessee State Library and Archives
Letter from Sgt. Bruce Elmore, Co. C, 143rd N.Y. Inf. Regt., USA to his mother. Author writes of engagements at Chattanooga in November 1863 and concludes "But we was entirely successful and next morning the stars and stripes waved over; Lookout Mountain and the Rebels had lost one of the strongest positions for defense that nature ever formed.".
Tennessee State Library and Archives
Farm journal of Thomas H. Fowlkes (born January,1815 died Oct. 18, 1873) a large farm and plantation owner in Dyer County, Tennessee. Two volumes of the his journals survive. This one is a typical daily farm journal; Obio007 contains unusual slave info.; This volume seems to jump around and includes entries from 1859, 1862, 1865, 1867, and 1868. Entries include expenses paid, payments made, as well as a complete inventory of the house, barns, dairy, and wheat house, etc