Hagley Museum and Library - Manuscripts and Archives Department
Leonard W. Walton was a printing industry executive with Milprint, Inc., between 1936 and 1976. His collection of Milprint records primarily consists of printing samples including candy wrappers, cigarette boxes, potato chip and bread bags and bacon boxes.
Hagley Museum and Library - Manuscripts and Archives Department
Charles Findeisen (1919-2007) was an aerial photographer hobbyist turned professional and spent most of his life flying airplanes. Findeisen consulted for real estate development concerns, engineering firms, and construction companies among others. Virtually all of his work was in the tri-state region of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. This collection contains his aerial photography from 1962 to 2000. It is comprised mostly of negatives but does include some photographs. Many of his subjects were photographed over time at regular intervals. This is particularly true of real estate development programs and building projects. But there is also one-off material of current events, local places, and landmarks.
Hagley Museum and Library - Manuscripts and Archives Department
David Jayne (1798-1866) purchased a drug store in Philadelphia in 1836. His patent medicine business grew quickly and he built this new building in 1850. The building was designed by American architects, William J. Johnston (1811-1849) and Thomas U. Walter (1804-1887) and was located at 242 Chestnut Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The firm of Dr. D. Jayne and Son was one of the largest patent medicine firms in the United States, and this building was "the most conspicuous building of the time" in Philadelphia. Engraved on wood and printed by William B. Gihon (dates unknown), an illustrator and engraver.
Hagley Museum and Library - Manuscripts and Archives Department
The Cavalcade of America was an anthology drama radio program which aired weekly from 1935 to 1953. The radio show was sponsored by the DuPont Company, a chemical company, which began as a manufacturer of gunpowder in 1802. The DuPont Company created the Cavalcade of America as a promotional tool. The program dramatized historical events focusing on individual stories of heroism, and occasionally presented a musical performance. This collection contains recordings of most of the show's episodes and consists of over 2,900 phonograph albums, approximately 500 sound tape reels, 6 sound cassettes and one scrapbook.
Hagley Museum and Library - Manuscripts and Archives Department
E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company was established in 1802 by Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours (1739-1817) and his son Éleuthère Irénée du Pont (1771-1834). The du Ponts purchased a mill site on the banks of the Brandywine River just North of Wilmington, Delaware. The pulp keg mill, after the powder yards closed, was used for record storage by the DuPont Company. (Currently, it is a Hagley Museum and Library property, the Hall of Records.) In 1903, the DuPont Company's Executive Committee established the Experimental Station, a research facility located on the banks of the Brandywine Creek across from the du Pont's first black powder works. This collection consists of photographs and negatives from the DuPont Company's Secretary's Department showing the Hall of Records at various times and one aerial view of the Experimental Station.
Hagley Museum and Library - Manuscripts and Archives Department
Crawford Hallock Greenewalt (1902-1993) was a chemist and President of the DuPont Company from 1948 to 1962. This collection consists of five color transparencies of the DuPont Company President's office interiors (previously identified as Pierre S. du Pont's office, but now believed to be Crawford Greenewalt's office).
Hagley Museum and Library - Manuscripts and Archives Department
World's Fairs or International Expositions are large-scale exhibitions that highlight technology, agriculture and other innovations of national or cultural significance. The New York World's Fair took place in Flushing Meadows, Queens from April 30, 1939 to October 31, 1940. The theme was "The World of Tomorrow." This item is the sheet music for the official song of the 1939/1940 New York's World's Fair.
Hagley Museum and Library - Manuscripts and Archives Department
The Erie City Iron Works in Erie, Pennsylvania, was a major manufacturer of boilers, stationary and portable engines, and machinery for sawmills and steam riveting. The collection consists of technical diagrams of engines.
Hagley Museum and Library - Manuscripts and Archives Department
All American Engineering Company was an aeronautical engineering and research firm which was incorporated on October 31, 1952. The company was originally a division of All American Aviation, Inc. This collection consists primarily of films. There is a small amount of photographs which corresponds directly to the film material. The collection is organized into two series: Films and Photographs, both series are arranged alphabetically. Dating from 1937 to 1984, the Films series documents the company’s innovations in the aviation industry, including pickup and recovery systems, catapults and arresting gear. The photographs document different design projects and tests; most of this research was related to the aviation industry. There are photographs of the facilities at the DuPont Airport on Centre Road near Greenville, Delaware, and the Georgetown, Delaware, test plant. Richard du Pont and other personnel appear in some of the images.
Hagley Museum and Library - Manuscripts and Archives Department
World's Fairs or International Expositions are large-scale exhibitions that highlight technology, agriculture and other innovations of national or cultural significance. The New York World's Fair took place in Flushing Meadows, Queens from April 30, 1939 to October 31, 1940. The theme was "The World of Tomorrow." This small collection consists of souvenir items from the 1939 New York World's Fair.